How to have a successful Low FODMAP BBQ

11 June 2018

This weekend in Melbourne, Australia, it is the Queen’s Birthday Public Holiday. The weather has been beautiful and a BBQ in the park with the kids is the perfect long weekend activity.

 

If you follow The FODMAP Talk you already know that being Low FODMAP (or modified Low FODMAP) doesn’t mean compromising or missing out on the good things that life has to offer. I try my best every single day not to let irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) to take over my life. Many times it means making an effort. But that’s OK. As long as I keep enjoying life with IBS and the FODMAP Diet – it’s all worth it.

According to estimations, 1 in 7 people suffer from IBS worldwide. IBS symptoms include abdominal bloating or pain, excess wind, nausea, diarrhoea and constipation (or a combination of both).

According to research, the FODMAP Diet can help 75% of IBS patients. That is 3 of 4 people who suffer from IBS! 

5 tips for having a great Low FODMAP BBQ when you have IBS.  

1. Choose the right location

When you have IBS – a good location for a BBQ doesn’t only mean nice views and fun activities for the kids. It also means toilets nearby. We are very lucky here in Melbourne – many parks offer public BBQ facilities, playgrounds for kids, picnic tables – and public toilets. I chose the location of our BBQ according to these important criteria. The fact that in the back of my head I knew that we had toilets near-by just made me enjoy the activities and be relaxed. So don’t be shy and if needed ask – are there toilets nearby? Are they active?

2. Don’t count on luck - bring Low FODMAP food

Following the Low FODMAP Diet (or a modified Low FODMAP Diet) means we need to make adjustments – but it definitely doesn’t mean we need to miss out! Bring food that you know you can eat – and enjoy eating.


Think about all aspects of the BBQ: from the meat (or vegetarian option), to the bread, condiments and sides.

“Lewis and Son”, a local Melbournian company, were kind enough to provide The FODMAP Talk with several of their Low FODMAP Certified products to try out. Lewis and Son has an extensive range of Low FODMAP Certified products – all certified by FODMAP Friendly.

The FODMAP Friendly certification is applied to products that are scientifically tested to be low in FODMAPs. The FODMAP Friendly Food Program is the only registered Certification Trademark worldwide, certifying the FODMAP levels in packaged foods.

 

We brought to the BBQ two types of Lewis and Son's Low FODMAP Certified sausages, pickles and sauerkraut. Everything was delicious, and everyone enjoyed it!

 

For bread, I got Glick’s Gluten-free burger buns, which seems Low FODMAP by ingredients (meaning the buns are not certified).   

 

The combination was delicious and I enjoyed a scrumptious BBQ and didn’t feel like I was missing out on anything!

3.  Don’t be shy

When we are in a BBQ, food and drinks will be shared. This is part of the fun and the experience. Nonetheless, as some meat and vegetarian options can contain garlic, onion and other high FODMAPs – don’t be shy to say: this item is for me. It’s OK.

4. A great opportunity to share the FODMAP love

Expanding on tip number 3 (don’t be shy) – family and friends gatherings are a great opportunity to spread the FODMAP love. Bringing Low FODMAP food to the BBQ is a great opportunity to explain what Low FODMAP means, how it helps you deal with IBS and why it is so important to you.

The Low FODMAP Diet aims to reduce and manage symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).  According to estimations, 1 in 7 people suffer from IBS worldwide. IBS symptoms include abdominal bloating or pain, excess wind, nausea, diarrhoea and constipation (or a combination of both). According to research, the FODMAP Diet, which was created by Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, can help 75% of IBS patients. That is 3 of 4 people who suffer from IBS!  In fact, the FODMAP Diet is recognised internationally by leading medical professionals as the best dietary treatment for the management of symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

5. Bring toilet paper

Most of the times I have a roll of toilet paper in my handbag. Most toilets will have sufficient amount of toilet paper, however you just don’t know when and where you will need it. If I am in a situation where I know for sure I will have to use public toilets – then a role is a must. (To be honest I am not the only one who might need to use it). So when you pack for your BBQ don’t forget to pack a toilet paper roll.  

 

 

Now all is left is to enjoy!!

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© 2018 by The FODMAP Talk (hello@thefodmaptalk.com)

DISCLAIMER: The information provided via the "The FODMAP Talk" channels does not intend to replace professional advice provided by a qualified health care professional (e.g. a registered dietitian, medical practitioner etc.).