A beautiful Low FODMAP Frittata 
 

11 May 2018

Frittata is one of the best Low FODMAP foods out there. It’s so easy to make and you can add so many different vegetables and cheeses to make it fun and interesting.

 

The only thing you have to make sure before starting is that you have an oven-safe deep pan. The rest can be figured out as you go.

Frittatas are great for breakfast, lunch or dinner. They can be eaten hot or cold, with or without toppings.

You can also add some leftovers - for example in this frittata I just added some baked sweet potatoes I had laying in my fridge. 

Low FODMAP Frittata

 

Ingredients

1 tablespoon garlic infused oil

10-15 cherry tomatoes

3 spring onion, finely slices, green parts only

1 cup spinach

8 large eggs

1/4 cup lactose free milk

1/3 cup diced tasty / gouda cheese

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

Salt and pepper

 

To serve
Rocket leaves, crumbled feta, finely sliced green onions (green parts only)

 

Method

- Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius

- In a deep oven-safe pan heat the garlic infused oil

- Chop the cherry tomatoes and add them to the pan, sliced side facing the pan. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

- Chop the spring onions and add to the pan. Mix well and cook for 1-2 minutes.

- Add the spinach and cook for additional 1-2 minutes.

- Meanwhile, whisk the eggs and then add the milk, cheese, turmeric and seasoning.

- Add the mixture to the pan, tilting it to make sure the eggs mix well with the veggies.

- Cook on medium heat for 2 minutes until the mixtures starts to set.

- Quickly insert the pan into the hot oven and bake for additional 10-12 minutes or until set. Check with a fork to make sure it’s ready.

- After the frittata cooled down a bit, add your toppings – rocket leaves, some crumbled feta and spring onion.

 

Enjoy!

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